100 meadows project | 21-40

Marian ParsonsArt, Artistic Endeavors, Oil Painting28 Comments

Well, I’ve been sticking with the 100 meadows project and I do believe that I will make it to 100!  I am almost halfway there and I found myself getting emotional when I completed #40.  I have grown so much and learned so much.  This has been such a worthwhile artistic undertaking on so many levels and it has pushed me to explore oils and practice them almost daily.

If you’d like to see my progress from the beginning, you can check out 1-20 HERE.

I’ve also shared about the 100 Meadows Project HERE and what I’ve learned so far about working with oils in PART 1 and PART 2.

In this post, I’m sharing paintings 21-40…

My second group of 20 was kicked off with a yellow-flower-filled meadow in Switzerland.  I struggled on the tree and the composition of this one, but I was enjoying skies more and I like the softness of the distant mountains.

I snapped this picture out of a car window and I loved painting it.  It was the first structure I included in a painting and it added so much.  I also learned how fun pine trees can be…

This one gave me a hard time!  The sky was so beautiful, but the foreground was dark and complex and I really struggled with it.  After painting it, wiping it off, repainting it, wiping it off again, etc… I finally took a pair of scissors and cut off the foreground!  I just needed to call it done and walk away.

And I jumped right into another challenging one, but I worked through it.  I absolutely love the sky in this one.  It’s one of my favorite skies so far.  The trucks and corn fields pushed me, but that’s the point of this challenge.  Dig in, learn, make mistakes, make discoveries.

After two paintings that required some fortitude, I decided to do one that was loose and just a hint of a landscape.  It’s loosely based on a photograph, but I left out the sheep and any detail.  I hope to circle back to that one once I feel more confident to tackle the critters and structure of the wall.  This one was freeing, though, and therapeutic.

Number 26 was a picture I snapped when we first visited Minnesota.  It’s of a little ramshackle barn that caught my eye.  I’m hoping to get some more pictures of it to paint.  I’m happy with how this one turned out, but I’m looking forward to trying it again.

Number 27 was all about that bold sky!  I was still having trouble with “heavy” clouds, but this was a good exercise.

I decided to try something new and paint the same scene twice, side-by-side.  The first one was detailed and I took my time.  The second one was loose and quick.  I ended up liking the detailed one in the end, but I liked having two canvases to explore.

I did the same thing with 30 and 31.   My structures are definitely better when I take the time to measure them out.

 

I love the composition of 32, with the single tree, mowed path, and pretty sky.  I was overall very happy with how this one turned out, but I still wanted more warmth and variation in my greens.

When I started number 33, I was very intimidated by the foreground trees and the fog , but again, this is about pushing myself past what feels comfortable and easy.  And I loved the result.  It’s one of my favorites so far and I learned a lot about building up values in trees and I felt like my background trees were improving.

And one fog led to another…

This one was big for me, because of that big, dark swath of trees.  I had to take a pair of scissors to the last one, but I was determined to push through this one and find the nuances in the shadow.

Since I had a lot of gray on the palette, I painted another gray, moody sky.  This one is another favorite of mine, because of the interesting cloud formation.

 

 

Loran’s last picture beat me (it was the one I hacked off with scissors), so I wanted to try another.  This one was also a challenge, just because of all the layers, but it was much more successful than the previous one!

 

For 37-38, I tried barns again and also painted two versions side-by-side.  I love how both of these turned out!  I experimented with using a palette knife to knock down brush strokes in the foreground, which gave an interesting look, I think.

39 is more of a mountain than a meadow, but I remember similar scenes from my childhood, so I felt drawn to paint it.  I’m really happy with the mountain, but still feel like the house and tree may have too much detail.  I’m still searching for that balance.

And, with leftover paint on the palette, I painted a quick landscape that has some water in it.  I can tell I was relaxed when I painted this, which I like.

Many of the original paintings are already spoken for by the people who submitted the inspiration pictures, but I have about eight to list for sale (from this batch and a couple from 1-20 that I decided to let go.)  I will be painting more, though!

You can buy prints of #1-40 in my Society6 shop.  (And the prints on Society6 are 25% right now!)

I will list the originals in my online shop on Monday morning.

If you want to follow this journey in more detail, I share a lot on my Instagram Stories.

100 meadows project | 21-40

Related Posts

the work of gardening gnomes & painting peonies

live painting class | grazing cow painting

the antique french paint box

live painting class | still life with flowers & glass

28 Comments on “100 meadows project | 21-40”

  1. They are all good..and your progress is inspiring. No. 32 was a special treat… because it is a personal favorite view submitted by a personal favorite person!

  2. Your painting is amazing! I have always wanted to try oils but I have no idea what I’m doing. Do you clean your brushes as you go? I’m so intimidated by this process but you are inspiring me! Your doing an amazing job.

  3. Don’t miss the new movie ” Loving Vincent”
    Make sure to see how they made it. One hundred artists painting !

  4. Agree with Carla from Kansas, 33 and 34 are really good. The best in my opinion. For what that’s worth 🙂

  5. You are doing a great job on your paintings, I think they all look better than the photos. You are inspiring me to do some days of one thing for a painting project. Thank you for putting yourself out there with your art and inspiring others. Blessings to you!

  6. You are now in my Art I Love folder on Pinterest~Have loved following on IG stories..finall my subscription to your blog has worked with my alternate email addrees..Good for you for finding the time and taking the time for this lovely creative challenge..
    Monique

  7. Wonderful work! You will just get better and better as an artist! I must paint every day to continue to learn and expand my knowledge of my medium. Working in pastels for 30 some years and I’ve been rewarded with sales and honors. All my best.

  8. Wow! Stunning! I’m so impressed. Tried to pick a favorite, but couldn’t. You have a lot to be proud of!!

  9. No. 33 was my favorite also. You use colors sometimes that remind me of a little animated film I saw in elementary school (I’m 60) about Johnny Appleseed. The colors were so beautiful that it made an impact I’ve never forgotten. Every so often I see one of your pieces, and I think of that film.

  10. Marian, I just love your paintings !!

    They are just beautiful! I hope you consider selling them at some point!

  11. Absolutely awe inspiring! I think you are an amazing artist. What a gift you have!
    Please add my name to the long list of your fans that want to buy one or more of your paintings!

  12. You make painting these lovely landscapes look so effortless! I would be inspired to try myself if I had a partical of skill! Celebrate your talents!

  13. OK Miss Mustard SEED-Monet..!!!!
    27,…expected to see the ladies with bustles and parasols!!!
    33,….like in Monet’s haystacks paintings…! does anyone else see the similarities!
    Your style is really beautiful Marian!
    Way to go! love to see the variations from one painting to the next, great body of work !
    Thanks for sharing!!!! <3

  14. I am impressed because I started painting a few years ago and I know it’s not as easy as it looks. You are very good.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *